design-is-fine:

Norbertine von Bresslern-Roth, zebra finch, ducks, fantails, 1922. Cat, 1925. Crabs, 1926. Color linocuts. Source 1|2|3|4|5

The austrian lady was one of the finest linocut artists of the 20th century. 

soundrift:

Coum Transmission- pre Throbbing Gristle

soundrift:

Coum Transmission- pre Throbbing Gristle

(via humanjeans)

drawpaintprint:

Adolph Gottlieb. Blues, 1962 - oil on canvas (Smithsonian) 
In the late 1950s, Adolph Gottlieb started his “burst” paintings, a series of works that showed smooth, round areas of color above vigorous brushstrokes and splatters. This method brought together the two main currents of abstract expressionism: the soft tones of color field painting and the dramatic gestures of action painting. The black shape at the bottom of this image reflects the artist’s movement as he applied paint in one wide, twisting brushstroke. In contrast, the shades of blue above blend softly from light to dark, as if he used slower, more careful brushstrokes. Gottlieb played with opposites, painting pairs of shapes that evoke dualities such as night and day, sun and earth, and male and female (Alloway and MacNaughton, Adolph Gottlieb: A Retrospective, 1981).
ADOLPH GOTTLIEB: “Well, it happened that the title of that first painting was “Burst” so since then everybody calls them Bursts. Although I give them all different titles. But there was a different type of space than I had ever used and it was a further clarification of what I was trying to do. The thing that was interesting was that it was a return to a focal point, but it was a focal point with but the kind of space that had existed in traditional painting. Because this was like a solitary image or two images that were just floating in the canvas space. They had to hold the space and they also had to create all the movements that took place within the rectangle.”Oral history interview with Adolph Gottlieb, 1967 Oct. 25, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. 

drawpaintprint:

Adolph Gottlieb. Blues, 1962 - oil on canvas (Smithsonian) 

In the late 1950s, Adolph Gottlieb started his “burst” paintings, a series of works that showed smooth, round areas of color above vigorous brushstrokes and splatters. This method brought together the two main currents of abstract expressionism: the soft tones of color field painting and the dramatic gestures of action painting. The black shape at the bottom of this image reflects the artist’s movement as he applied paint in one wide, twisting brushstroke. In contrast, the shades of blue above blend softly from light to dark, as if he used slower, more careful brushstrokes. Gottlieb played with opposites, painting pairs of shapes that evoke dualities such as night and day, sun and earth, and male and female (Alloway and MacNaughton, Adolph Gottlieb: A Retrospective, 1981).

ADOLPH GOTTLIEB: “Well, it happened that the title of that first painting was “Burst” so since then everybody calls them Bursts. Although I give them all different titles. But there was a different type of space than I had ever used and it was a further clarification of what I was trying to do. The thing that was interesting was that it was a return to a focal point, but it was a focal point with but the kind of space that had existed in traditional painting. Because this was like a solitary image or two images that were just floating in the canvas space. They had to hold the space and they also had to create all the movements that took place within the rectangle.”

Oral history interview with Adolph Gottlieb, 1967 Oct. 25, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. 

cavetocanvas:

Adolph Gottlieb, Notations, 1966

cavetocanvas:

Adolph Gottlieb, Notations, 1966

dynamitehemorrhage:

Well, this is something of a find – a good-quality audience tape of the very first FLESH EATERS show at Los Angeles’ Masque in December 1977…! Are you kidding me? I would have given my right arm for this thing at any point during the past 30 years, and it’s just been sitting there since May waiting for all of us to listen to it.

Thanks to Jon Hope for hipping me to this site Noise Addiction II – I’ve barely even dug through it yet and have already found that the site is just bursting with LA punk and oddities from the 70s and 80s. Don’t mind me, I’m over here shoving files into my piehole.

So the Flesh Eaters, in their very first show, still sound searing and raw on most tracks. This was from Chris D.’s “screaming” phase, which you can read him disowning in our own Dynamite Hemorrhage #1 fanzine, which has a lengthy interview with him about this era. The tape contains their cover of the Magic Band’s “Plastic Factory” as well as another cover I can’t place right now….can you? The tape cuts out just as the monstrous “Automaton Bombs” is just getting locked and loaded.

I can help a little with the song titling as well. Minus the one I don’t know, here’s what you’ll hear:

FLESH EATERS – live at the Masque, December 21st, 1977

  1. Disintegration Nation
  2. Agony Shorthand
  3. Police Gun Jitters
  4. Plastic Factory
  5. Achieve That Reject
  6. Brain Time
  7. title unknown
  8. Jesus Don’t Come Through the Cotton
  9. Automaton Bombs

Download the thing here.

milescosmo:

funkvibe:

ok do you see this Legendary Epic woman right here? this is wendy fucking carlos and i’m going to describe to you why wendy carlos is 30 thousand times better than you
she is a 74 year old trans fucking woman. she remembers having dysphoria at age five and started hrt in 1968. you think transitioning is difficult now? try doing it in 1968. the thought scares the shit out of me.
her first album, switched on bach, is a literal hour of her playing bach’s music on synthesizers. that’s classical edm. edm wouldn’t exist if she hadn’t brought synthesizers to prominence. the catch? synthesizers in 1968 were monophonic. that means you can only play one note at a time. wendy carlos sat there and played each instrument’s piece of bachs music at least 6 times per symphony, painstakingly overdubbing and rerecording each line, one at a time.
oh yeah, switched on bach was the first classical album to sell more than 500k copies and she won 3 grammies and stayed on the billboard #1 pop charts for 17 weeks.
you know tron? that really awesome movie whose sequel daft punk made the ost for? wendy is the original daft punk. tron’s soundtrack was all her; not only that, but so was a clockwork orange and the shining. 
in 1998 this piece of shit momus (aka nick currie on wired) made a song mocking wendy’s sexual orientation. $50k of currie’ money later, she forced him to remove that song from his entire collection, have the master destroyed, and his music career fucking died after that.
figured i’d post this since daft punk keep getting a lot of love. i love daft punk, but they owe their lives to this fucking badass.

Not sure how I feel about the phrase “classical EDM” or any reference to EDM when talking about electronic music pioneers but Wendy fucken Carlos! RESPECT!

milescosmo:

funkvibe:

ok do you see this Legendary Epic woman right here? this is wendy fucking carlos and i’m going to describe to you why wendy carlos is 30 thousand times better than you

  1. she is a 74 year old trans fucking woman. she remembers having dysphoria at age five and started hrt in 1968. you think transitioning is difficult now? try doing it in 1968. the thought scares the shit out of me.
  2. her first album, switched on bach, is a literal hour of her playing bach’s music on synthesizers. that’s classical edm. edm wouldn’t exist if she hadn’t brought synthesizers to prominence. the catch? synthesizers in 1968 were monophonic. that means you can only play one note at a time. wendy carlos sat there and played each instrument’s piece of bachs music at least 6 times per symphony, painstakingly overdubbing and rerecording each line, one at a time.
  3. oh yeah, switched on bach was the first classical album to sell more than 500k copies and she won 3 grammies and stayed on the billboard #1 pop charts for 17 weeks.
  4. you know tron? that really awesome movie whose sequel daft punk made the ost for? wendy is the original daft punk. tron’s soundtrack was all her; not only that, but so was a clockwork orange and the shining. 
  5. in 1998 this piece of shit momus (aka nick currie on wired) made a song mocking wendy’s sexual orientation. $50k of currie’ money later, she forced him to remove that song from his entire collection, have the master destroyed, and his music career fucking died after that.

figured i’d post this since daft punk keep getting a lot of love. i love daft punk, but they owe their lives to this fucking badass.

Not sure how I feel about the phrase “classical EDM” or any reference to EDM when talking about electronic music pioneers but Wendy fucken Carlos! RESPECT!

(via timebasedmetadatagod)

nataliakoptseva:

Klimt, Gustav

Beethoven Frieze - Hostile forces

(via rovertnosnoj)